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Cards Against Humanity raises banner at Route 66 Stadium

JOLIET – Cards Against Humanity, the Chicago-based card game company known for its dark humor card game, hung a banner across the gates of Joliet’s newly named Route 66 Stadium downtown.

The cryptic banner, which reads, “Cards Against Humanity Baseball Place,” was placed Friday.

The company was not available to comment on future plans or what the banner means.

Heather Mills, general manager for the Joliet Slammers, also said she could not comment on why the banner was there, but said more information would be available later in the week.

In a video released in November, Cards Against Humanity promoted its efforts to block the Trump administration from building the controversial border wall by buying plots of land on the U.S.-Mexico border. The video also suggests this was the first of five stunts.

In the same video near the 0:47 mark, a set of blueprints are visible on a table that resemble the front of Route 66 Stadium.

Cards Against Humanity has a history of large-scale pranks and public stunts. In 2016, the company accepted $5 donations to “dig a big stupid hole” called the Holiday Hole on Black Friday. It raised more than $100,000. After digging for nearly two days straight, they filled in the hole for “insurance reasons.”

In 2015, the company asked their supporters to “Give Us $5” for nothing in return. They raised more than $70,000.

In 2014, the company pulled all its products from their website and only sold a $6 box, advertised as a profane name for cow excrement, on its website. Thirty-thousand people bought the product – only to find that it was in fact cow excrement.