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Health

Problem Solving Courts receive generous contribution

Anonymous donor lost loved one to heroin overdose

Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow created Friends of Will County Problem Solving Courts, and will chair its Board of Directors with (from left) Will County Board member Suzanne Hart and retired Will County Board member Ann Dralle.
Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow created Friends of Will County Problem Solving Courts, and will chair its Board of Directors with (from left) Will County Board member Suzanne Hart and retired Will County Board member Ann Dralle.

JOLIET – Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announced that a $50,000 contribution from a generous anonymous donor has led to the formation of a nonprofit organization that will supplement services, training, and equipment for Will County’s Problem Solving Courts, which are on the frontline in battling the opioid epidemic.

Glasgow created the organization, Friends of Will County Problem Solving Courts and will chair its Board of Directors. Directors also include Will County Board member Suzanne Hart and retired Will County Board member Ann Dralle.

The board met for the first time recently to establish and approve its bylaws and to formally accept the generous donation.

Hart was instrumental in securing the contribution from the anonymous donor, who is a friend and former business leader who lost a family member to a heroin overdose.

Glasgow spearheaded the creation of Will County’s first Problem Solving Court in the late 1990s when he wrote a grant the led to the formation of the Will County Drug Court.

The success of that program led him to initiate the formation of the Will County Veterans Court in 2012 to assist veterans who struggled with addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder and other disorders resulting from their service.

He also pushed for the creation of a mental health court to assist those struggling with mental health issues, and a Redeploy Illinois Court to steer qualifying repeat offenders away from criminal activities.

All of these highly specialized programs, which involve intensive court supervision, addiction treatment, counseling and therapy, now fall under the umbrella of the Will County Problem Solving Courts.

One possible use of the funding could be to introduce biofeedback therapy into the Problem Solving Court programs. This unique therapy helps eliminate stress and anxiety for those who are experiencing withdrawal while receiving treatment and counseling for their addictions. It also can assist veterans who are suffering from PTSD. 

Funds could cover the equipment and training associated with this therapy. Other equipment and training options for the Problem Solving Courts also are being explored.

The Problem Solving Courts have been progressive in the introduction of innovative services for clients. In recent years, the courts have developed fitness and nutrition programs to help clients maintain their health during treatment. In addition, comfort dogs visit clients during group and individual counseling sessions to reduce stress and anxiety.

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