Digital Access

Digital Access
Access theherald-news.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, sports, business, classified and more! News you can use every day.

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, weather, and more.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Have our latest news, sports and obituaries emailed directly to you Monday through Friday so you can keep up with what's happening in the area.
State

Illinois House votes to ban bump stocks

In this Friday, May 30, 2014 file photo, lawmakers are seen on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield Ill. More than two-dozen legislators, about 15 percent of the General Assembly, have either resigned months into the current session or said they won't seek re-election. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File)
In this Friday, May 30, 2014 file photo, lawmakers are seen on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield Ill. More than two-dozen legislators, about 15 percent of the General Assembly, have either resigned months into the current session or said they won't seek re-election. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File)

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois House has voted to ban "bump stock" accessories that transform rifles into assault-style weapons.

The legislation was the first of seven gun-restriction measures the House is considering Wednesday. The plan sponsored by Democratic Rep. Martin Moylan of Des Plaines was OK'd 83-31.

Lawmakers are responding to the Parkland, Florida massacre on Feb. 14 that killed 17 students and the fatal shooting of a Chicago police officer a day earlier.

Moylan sponsored similar legislation last fall because the gunman in the October Las Vegas mass shooting used a bump stock. It failed then because critics said it was too broad.

Possession of assault-style weapons by anyone under 21 would be illegal under legislation that the Illinois House endorsed.

The plan sponsored by Democratic Rep. Michelle Mussman of Schaumburg would prohibit minors from buying or possessing high-capacity weapons, attachments, .50-caliber rifles and cartridges. They would have 90 days to transfer ownership.

The legislation was OK'd 64-51.

Critics decried the idea that the government would confiscate property. Mussman said authorities will not visit homes to pick up weapons. But a first offense for getting caught with prohibited firearms would be a misdemeanor offense.

Loading more