Digital Access

Digital Access
Access theherald-news.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, sports, business, classified and more! News you can use every day.

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, weather, and more.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Have our latest news, sports and obituaries emailed directly to you Monday through Friday so you can keep up with what's happening in the area.
Local News

Will County judge frustrated by locker room voyeur case

Ryan Thompson, 28, Joliet
Ryan Thompson, 28, Joliet

A Will County judge was frustrated by some problems posed by the sentencing of a former school janitor convicted of making secret locker room videos of adolescent girls.

At Tuesday’s court hearing, Judge David Carlson said he stood by his decision to sentence Ryan Thompson, 28, of Joliet to five years in prison after he pleaded guilty to unauthorized video recording. But Carlson said he didn’t know if prison provided “a level of safeguards” for the public and if it would prevent Thompson from reoffending.

Thompson’s attorney, Nicole Sartori, has asked Carlson to reconsider sentencing Thompson to 30 months of probation so he can finish his psychological treatment to fully address his “underlying demons” and move on with his life.

“That is more protection to the public than to incarcerate him,” Sartori said.

Carlson said he looked over the court transcripts from his own sentencing decision and saw “nothing in there I disagree with.” However, Carlson was frustrated that Thompson’s crime was an offense that would not require him to register as a sex offender.

Carlson scheduled a hearing for Sept. 24 for a prison official to speak on the treatment Thompson would receive while in prison.

Prosecutor Elizabeth Domagalla said prison was appropriate to ensure public safety and not detract from the seriousness of Thompson’s crime.

She said that whether he goes to prison or receives treatment, he would have to be honest about the risks he poses to others’ safety and that treatment is not a cure-all.

Loading more