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Health

Six Joliet students attend American Heart Association event

Joliet West High School students – Lucy Magat, Paola Castro, Krystal Steg, Sema Patel, Sequoia Grantham and Juell Lagonero – attended the Go Red for Women STEM event held Nov. 5 at Northwestern Medicine’s Prentice Women’s Hospital.
Joliet West High School students – Lucy Magat, Paola Castro, Krystal Steg, Sema Patel, Sequoia Grantham and Juell Lagonero – attended the Go Red for Women STEM event held Nov. 5 at Northwestern Medicine’s Prentice Women’s Hospital.

Joliet West High School students – Lucy Magat, Paola Castro, Krystal Steg, Sema Patel, Sequoia Grantham and Juell Lagonero – attended the Go Red for Women STEM event held Nov. 5 at Northwestern Medicine’s Prentice Women’s Hospital.

The students are members of HOSA Future Healthcare Professional Students.

The STEM event introduced more than 100 high school students to some of Chicago’s leading science, technology and engineering companies showcasing their innovative work.

The day was set to inspire and empower high school girls to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by considering the diverse STEM careers.

The event consisted of speed mentoring, breakout sessions led by top STEM-related organizations, and opportunities for students to network with other participating companies and women leaders.

Go Red for Women is the American Heart Association's national movement to end heart disease and strokes in women, and advocates for more research and swifter action for women's heart health.

Cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. kill about one woman every 80 seconds. The good news is that 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes.

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