Digital Access

Digital Access
Access theherald-news.com and all Shaw Media Illinois content from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, sports, business, classified and more! News you can use every day.

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, weather, and more.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Have our latest news, sports and obituaries emailed directly to you Monday through Friday so you can keep up with what's happening in the area.
Local News

Foundation to host discussions on racial breast cancer disparities in Joliet

Initiative aims to improve outcomes for black women

The Susan G. Komen Foundation will host focus group discussions in Joliet to improve breast cancer outcomes among Black women.
The Susan G. Komen Foundation will host focus group discussions in Joliet to improve breast cancer outcomes among Black women.

A national foundation will host focus group discussions in Joliet in an effort to improve breast cancer outcomes among black women.

The discussions are part of the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s African American Health Equity Initiative to collect information about racial disparities among breast cancer patients, according to a news release.

The project aims to gather information in the 12 metropolitan areas with the highest breast cancer disparities, including the Chicago area, neighboring Lake County, Indiana, and particularly Will and Cook counties.

The discussion sessions in Will County are scheduled for 3 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at Nowell Park Recreation Center, 199 Mills Road, Joliet.

The focus group discussions will be held for “African American women who have not been diagnosed with breast cancer” and “African American women who are breast cancer survivors,” according to the release.

Those interested can sign up for either session by calling 833-948-1250.

The initiative’s ultimate goal is to improve breast cancer outcomes among black women by 25% in five years within metro areas with the greatest current disparities.

African American women are about 40% more likely than white women to die of breast cancer in the U.S., according to the foundation.

The public health organization John Snow is helping gather information.

For information about the Komen’s African American Health Equity Initiative, visit its website at ww5.komen/org/AAHealthEquity.

Loading more