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Local News

Bolingbrook Chamber of Commerce joins group to fight progressive tax

Law change requires 60% of voters approving

Stay informed with Shaw Local's Election Central. Research your ballot, where the candidates stand on the issues and set yourself up with a reminder to vote.

The Bolingbrook Area Chamber of Commerce with 12 other organizations joined a coalition to advocate against the passage of a state progressive income tax which voters will weigh in on this November.

The Vote No on the Progressive Tax coalition announced that the 13 groups joined to "fight back against this latest attempt by Springfield politicians to hike taxes on small employers and destroy jobs," according to a news release.

The Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce and the Illinois Black and Hispanic chamber groups also joined the coalition.

“We all know that taxes influence how businesses operate," Larry Ivory, president of the Black chamber group, said in the release. "With the proposed progressive tax, business sectors that largely employ women and minorities would be hit the hardest, and jobs will be eliminated."

The coalition is comprised of small businesses and "pro-taxpayer organizations" which argue a progressive tax will slow the state's economy and does nothing to alleviate the high property tax burden on residents.

Legislators passed a constitutional amendment to do away with a flat tax requirement, but 60% of voters still need to approve the change.

The legislature also passed higher income tax rates which would take effect if voters approve the constitutional change.

Gov. JB Pritzker has argued that the higher tax rates would only affect higher-income residents and that about 97% of residents would see either no change or a slight decrease in their state income taxes.

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