Digital Access

Digital Access
Access theherald-news.com and all Shaw Local content from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, sports, business, classified and more! News you can use every day.

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, weather, and more.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
Have our latest news, sports and obituaries emailed directly to you Monday through Friday so you can keep up with what's happening in the area.
Local Business

Collaborative Divorce: Creative Solutions Outside of Court

SPONSORED

Collaborative divorce has become a popular method of dissolving a marriage which involves the parties negotiating settlement terms through a series of meetings outside of court. The parties and their respective attorneys sign an agreement at the outset which commits to using the collaborative process to resolve all issues, and they will not utilize the court system to resolve them. However, upon reaching a complete agreement, a case is then filed in court and the agreement is signed by a judge, making it legal and enforceable.

"The goals of collaborative divorce include reaching a settlement in the most amicable way possible and settling issues in a private and non-adversarial manner," explained Erin Webster O'Brien, family law attorney. "It also helps avoid the negative economic, social, and emotional consequences of protracted and acrimonious litigation."

Collaborative law resolves issues without litigation and without seeking a court-imposed resolution, instead relying on an atmosphere of honesty, transparency, cooperation, and professionalism. Further, all reasonable options are considered to maximize opportunities for a settlement. According to O'Brien, the great part of collaborative divorce is the ability to be creative with solutions. "Instead of having a judge impose certain rulings upon the parties, they can include certain terms that work for them in their own lives, which a judge may not order in a traditional divorce," she said.

"Collaborative divorce relies on a team to help both sides reach an equitable agreement," added O'Brien. "The collaborative lawyers represent the respective parties, and educate, advise, and otherwise assist the clients in working effectively with all other optional participants. A financial specialist is a neutral participant who can help with budgeting, cash flow, property division, tax issues, valuations, and understanding financial instruments. A coach can assist in preparing a spouse for meetings, improving communication, managing tasks, and developing co-parenting skills when children are involved. A child specialist can also be involved and meet with any children to understand their needs, provide them with a voice, and work with parents to create a parenting plan."

Collaborative divorce not only allows the parties to control the pace of their separation, but they can also transition into their new, separate lives in the most respectable manner possible.

For more information about collaborative divorce, please contact:

Erin Webster O'Brien, Attorney

President, Will County Bar Association

Phone: 815-727-2100

Website: https://www.ewolaw.com